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dc.contributor.authorKhukhro, Ana
dc.contributor.editorMunday, Sara
dc.contributor.editorJahns, Sophia
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-22T11:53:46Z
dc.date.available2019-11-22T11:53:46Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://publications.mfo.de/handle/mfo/3687
dc.description.abstractGraphs are mathematical objects composed of a collection of “dots” called vertices, some of which are joined by lines called edges. Graphs are ideal for visually representing relations between things, and mathematical properties of graphs can provide an insight into real-life phenomena. One interesting property is how connected a graph is, in the sense of how easy it is to move between the vertices along the edges. The topic dealt with here is the construction of particularly well-connected graphs, and whether or not such graphs can happily exist in worlds similar to ours.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfachen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSnapshots of modern mathematics from Oberwolfach;2019,16
dc.rightsAttribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleExpander graphs and where to find themen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.14760/SNAP-2019-016-EN
local.series.idSNAP-2019-016-ENen_US
local.subject.snapshotAlgebra and Number Theoryen_US
local.subject.snapshotAnalysisen_US
local.subject.snapshotGeometry and Topologyen_US


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Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International